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There is no denying the trend of medical oncology practices being acquired by hospitals, whether through professional service agreements, employer–employee agreements, or something in between. The 2013 Community Oncology Practice Impact Report—published by the Community Oncology Alliance—shows that in the past 6 years, 469 (35%) of 1338 responding practices have been acquired, and the rate of acquisition has increased 20% in the 15 months since the 2012 report.
It seems that throughout 2014, those of us in oncology have ­been moving at 100 miles an hour. ­New challenges hit us every day and can involve regulatory or reimbursement issues, patient or personnel concerns, operational setbacks, or any combination of the above. We turn to our colleagues, resources such as Oncology Practice Management, and association conferences and meetings to stay well informed and ready to guide our organizations through the next day, week, month, or year. Despite the speed at which we are moving, though, I am awestruck at how far we still have to go. We are in the midst of a major healthcare transformation, and a window into oncology practices offers a microcosmic view of the entire healthcare system.
You make more money than you spend. It’s the right problem to have, but it’s a problem nonetheless. In fact, every new dollar of savings seems to call for a new investment strategy, but you don’t know where to begin. When you ignore the problem, cash piles up in your checking account—first $40,000, then 6 figures. Then you get nervous. If it was hard to invest a smaller sum, it seems impossible to invest more than $100,000.
Erlotinib With or Without Bevacizumab
Denosumab with Chemotherapy as First-Line Treatment
Safety and Efficacy of Adding Talactoferrin to Standard Chemo­therapy
Bavituximab Plus Docetaxel versus Docetaxel Plus Placebo
Carfilzomib with Irinotecan for Irinotecan-Sensitive Malig­nancies
Erlotinib Hydrochloride for Surgery-Removed Stage IB-II-­IIIA NSCLC
Nintedanib for Advanced NSCLC
Crizotinib for Stage IB-IIIA NSCLC Removed by Surgery
TH-302 or Placebo with Pemetrexed for Nonsquamous NSCLC
Custirsen for Patients with Stage IV NSCLC
I recently tuned into 60 Minutes to watch a segment on oncology drugs. This episode was of great interest to me since I have served as an administrator at a large oncology practice in Ohio for the past several decades. Long before this segment aired, however, I had been formulating my thoughts on the evolution of drug pricing and purchasing practices. During this time, I have observed a strong relationship between multiple levels of the healthcare system that fuel drug costs and purchase practices in community cancer centers in the United States. The practice of pricing drugs is a complex and often confusing process, and there are several trends that seem to contribute to rising healthcare costs.
Aquick review of the evening news will often reveal stories of someone in an organization either doing wrong or blowing the whistle on someone else who did wrong. No organization is immune from having its reputation questioned when an employee or manager is caught violating ethical or legal standards, and the fallout can be damaging in many ways.
The alignment of physicians with hospitals and health systems can be challenging in today’s healthcare climate, yet interest in alignment continues to expand. In some instances, the necessity of maintaining a strong and diverse medical staff coupled with the threat of losing critical team members and the subsequent closure of a business line may result in hospitals and health systems making decisions and promises they may not otherwise make.
San Diego, CA—Patient portals offer valuable benefits to providers and patients by enhancing patient–provider communication, increasing operational efficiencies, and empowering patients, according to data presented at the 2014 Association of Community Cancer Centers National Oncology Conference.
FDA Approves First Anti–PD-1: Pembrolizumab Indicated for Advanced Melanoma
Bortezomib Receives New FDA Indication
The following sections will assist healthcare professionals and payers by providing appropriate coding and billing information associated with the treatment of prostate cancer.
The interview featured in this article was conducted with Linda Bosserman, MD, FACP, at the 2014 conference of the Association for Value-Based Cancer Care.
Peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) is a broad term that encompasses several rare and often aggressive types of non-­Hodgkin lymphoma. The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society estimates that between 10% and 15% of patients with non-­Hodgkin lymphoma have a T-cell lymphoma subtype. According to data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry, the incidence of PTCL is less than 1 case per 100,000 individuals in the United States. PTCL is most often identified in patients aged e60 years.

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  • American Health and Drug Benefits
  • Association for Value Based Cancer Care
  • Lynx CME
  • Oncology Practice Management
  • Rheumatology Practice Management

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